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Quick Pick search help

Quick to pick up,

easy to use

Use keywords to get you close to the place where an expert keeps the information.

Save time and energy searching for information that may only be found in the deep web.

Use your favorite search engine as a starting place. Build a query that includes one or more of these words:

DATABASE, ARCHIVE, ALMANAC, REPOSITORY, STATISTICS, RECORDS, HISTORY, INFORMATION, SEARCH

Can you think of other synonyms?

 

  • Here's how to do that using the question:

 

  • “What classical composer's music is heard most often in movies? ”

  • First, think "who might know the answer to this question?"

  • If you have no idea where to find an expert, build a query in Google (or Yahoo, etc.) using important keywords for the concept and where the information may be stored. For example,

movie classical music database OR information

  • Your first search engine is not likely to retrieve the final answer, but it can get you to a database or source of information where you can search deeper for an answer.

  • If you already think you know an expert or organization that would likely have the answer, build a query in Google (or Yahoo, etc.) that gets you to that person or organization. For example,

Bohemian opera

  • Google will find a web site for Bohemian opera USING EITHER QUERY. The Google snippet provides clues that the Bohemian opera site may hold an answer to the question. Leaving Google behind, use the Bohemian opera search engine to search for specific information that answers the question.

Practice it now: Who might know the answer to the following questions and what queries could get you quickly to the information?

1. During the 2005/2006 season, which soccer team in the English Premier league had the fewest wins at home?

2. What was the closing stock price for Boeing (BA) on January 3, 2000?

Answers here

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